Software to Streamline the Data Deluge

Feature Article | April 29, 2011 by Christiane Stagge

The main themes of the OpenText Content Days were social media, WikiLeaks, and apps (photo: Christiane Stagge)

The main themes of the Content Days were social media, WikiLeaks, and apps (photo: Christiane Stagge)

From RSS feeds and blogs through wikis and Facebook entries – companies now have to deal with more than just content from SAP systems, office, e-mail, and exchange applications. Social media, microblogging services, and mobile applications have led to an explosion of data. As a result, companies are faced with more than 400 different content types.

At its Content Days 2011 in Munich, enterprise software company OpenText informed some 500 participants about how organizations can manage relevant content from social media and presented new mobile applications for use with iPhones, iPads, and the like. In his keynote, Tom Jenkins, executive chairman of OpenText, explained the situation we are in today.

Facebook, mobile apps, and cloud-based software have changed corporate structures. IT used to be a separate area within the company, and operating complicated enterprise software was the realm of the IT department alone. But today, individual areas have unshackled themselves from the IT department. Employees want to decide for themselves what software should be deployed in their area. This data and information overload means that people read less than they used to. Content is moving away from text and becoming more visual. Virtual conferences in 3D with avatars will become common in the enterprises of the future.

OpenText focuses on individual users – especially marketing employees. At the OpenText Content Days, the company presented mobile applications and content management systems for managing and processing content from social media applications. In addition to the classic applications such as document management, records management, and enterprise archiving, OpenText plans to cater to marketing employees’ needs to a greater extent with new engagement software. Among the innovations are an improved user interface, great ease of use, a clearer menu structure, and additional functions to measure individual projects.

Next page: ECM Systems for Social Media

With the hashtag #OTCDMUC, visitors secured their spot on the Twitter wall (photo: Christiane Stagge)

With the hashtag #OTCDMUC, visitors secured their spot on the Twitter wall (photo: Christiane Stagge)

Detlev Legler, vice president for sales EMEA at OpenText, opened the event (photo: Christiane Stagge)

Detlev Legler, vice president for sales EMEA at OpenText, opened the event (photo: Christiane Stagge)

ECM Software for Social Media

As the “original” Google, OpenText developed the first search engine 20 years ago for the Oxford English Dictionary. In 2007, the company concluded a reselling agreement with SAP and developed special applications to manage files, documents, and content from ERP systems (see the articles Roadmap: SAP’s ECM Systems and From iPad to Business).

Today, according to Jenkins, it’s not enough to just manage the data from ERP software. He believes developments are moving from the cloud (Web 2.0) to the semantic, personalized Web (Web 3.0): Facebook now has more than 500 million members and is used more often than Google. People use social networks and information services like Twitter to exchange knowledge and information. Marketing employees use social media platforms to gauge, observe, and govern the opinions and moods of their customers.

The new version of the OpenText ECM Suite 2010 was launched in October 2010 and is designed to enable people to manage social media content. Furthermore, the OpenText Social Communities software provides tools for creating blogs, wikis, and forums, in which marketing employees can present their products and brands and manage the corresponding campaigns.

OpenText Pulse brings Facebook into the office environment. The application can be imported free of charge into a company’s existing enterprise content management solution. As with solution media platforms, employees can “follow” their colleagues – in other words, they can find out about their activities and exchange messages. As a result, one colleague is immediately informed if another gets started on a new project or if the marketing department launches a new campaign.

Through the purchase of Nstein, OpenText plans to improve its semantic search capabilities. Those signed up to Getty Images can find out for themselves. When you enter a search term, several options and classifications are displayed. This means that the search can be narrowed down more effectively. For example, if a user is searching for the term “nail,” the engine differentiates between “tools” and “finger nails.”

ECM Software for Smartphones

The mobile application boom is showing no signs of abating: Apple’s App Store contains around 300,000 applications for iPhones and iPads. So far, more than 10 billion apps have been downloaded.

With OpenText Everywhere, employees will be able to access content and transactions at any time – regardless of whether they have an iPhone, an iPad, a BlackBerry, or another mobile device. Using the applications, people can search and manage content from the OpenText ECM Suite. A particularly practical feature is rendering, in which the views are adapted to the devices. What’s more, it will soon be possible to watch PowerPoint presentations on small smartphone displays.

Only recently, the example of WikiLeaks showed how fast information that people believed to be secure could be disseminated around the globe. With its software, OpenText claims to provide the security required. When searching for documents, special settings determine whether attributes such as indexed title are permitted to be displayed, whether changes can be made, whether it is possible to replace or upload content, or whether content can be released for downloading.

Tom Jenkins, executive chairman and chief strategy officer of OpenText, is focused on marketing employees (photo: Christiane Stagge)

Tom Jenkins, executive chairman and chief strategy officer of OpenText, is focused on marketing employees (photo: Christiane Stagge)

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